Although initially conceived as a voluntary program, seven states have crafted legislation to make OSHA 10-Hour and/or 30-hour Outreach training mandatory for employees.

The 10-Hour or 30-hour Outreach training programs are in-depth certification plans, created by OSHA and administered by government authorized trainers.

The 10-Hour programs take a minimum of two days to complete and the 30-Hour program a minimum of 4. Booth programs focus on the most prevalent hazards in the field and are designed to greatly improve worker safety.

While OSHA conceived these programs as voluntary, many contractors and seven states have made the completion of these programs mandatory.

Ensure your employees are certified in OSHA 10-Hour General Industry, OSHA 10-Hour Construction or OSHA 30-Hour Construction Outreach safety training through Delaware Valley Safety Council’s Online Institute.

With DVSC’s Online Institute, employees can earn an OSHA 10-Hour or 30-Hour card anywhere they have access to an Internet connection. For more information go to www.dvsconline.org.

Let’s take a look at the specific requirements of these states:

Connecticut- Sec. 31‐53b

Connecticut requires all employees completing work on any public building project paid for in whole or part by state funding, or any of its agencies, where the total cost is over $100,000 to obtain a minimum of an OSHA 10-Hour Construction card.

The contractor completing the job must submit proof that each employee has completed the training within 30 days of contract award. Any employee that does not have the training is not allowed on the jobsite.

The state requires the cards to be renewed every five years.

 

Missouri- Sec/n 292.675

Missouri is one of seven states requiring OSHA-Accepted training for any employee who works on any sort of public works project, whether at the state or municipal level.

The state requires employees complete a minimum of an OSHA 10-Hour training with 60 days of beginning work on a project, the employer doesn’t need to provide the contracting agency proof of training unless it is specifically requested.

Also the state does not require the training to be renewed.

 

Massachusetts-Chapter 30:Section 39S

All employers wanting to gain public sector contract work in Massachusetts are required to ensure all of their employees complete a minimum of an OSHA 10-Hour training course.

Prior to working on the site credentials of training must be submitted to the contracting agency, any employee working for the jobsite. If the employee does not have credentials they will be removed and the employer could possible face a fine.

 

New Hampshire

All on-site employees, working on publicly funded (including state, or local municipality) projects of $100,000 or more, must complete the OSHA 10-Hour Construction course prior to beginning work. An employee who has not completed the program shall be subject to removal from the worksite after 15 days of being found to be non-compliant.

The New Hampshire law provides for penalties to the employer of up to $2,500 and a civil penalty of $100 per employee for each day of noncompliance.

The law went into effect in 2007.

 

New York State-A02721

New York regulations require worker completing work on any public project greater than $250,000 in contract value to complete OSHA 10-Hour Construction training. The intent is to require that all employees of public work contractors receive such training “prior to the performing any work on the project.”

Proof of completion may include a copy of a course completion card or certificate. All training must be completed within the past five years, or training must be re-taken.

 

Nevada-Bill No. 148

Nevada assembly Bill No. 148 requires:

All construction workers in the state to undergo an OSHA 10-Hour Construction safety training course (OSHA 10-Hour Construction) developed by the U.S. Labor Department’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at least once every five years. The training must be completed no more than 15 days of being hired.

All supervisors on a construction site to undergo a 30-hour safety training course (OSHA 30-Hour Construction) approved by OSHA at least once every five years. The training must be completed no more than 15 days of being hired. If an employee or supervisor does not gain OSHA 10-Hour or 30-hour certification, then their employment must be terminated or suspended. Employers who fail to terminate or suspend employees are subject to administrative fines and penalties.

 

Pennsylvania P.A. 06‐175, S. 1.

Pennsylvania regulations require all employees completing work on any public project greater than $100,000 in contract value to complete OSHA 10-Hour Outreach training.

This training must be completed 15 days prior to the contract award, and documentation of completion for each employee must be provided to the state agency the contract was obtained through.

Any person who does not have an OSHA 10-Hour card, or whose training is more than five years old will not be allowed on the worksite.

 

Rhode Island-04-593

Rhode Island regulations require all workers in the state who perform work on municipal and state construction projects with a total project cost of one $100,000 of more to OSHA10-Hour Construction certification.

The state requires employees on public sector jobsites, to carry the card on their person at all times while work is actually being performed.

Any employee required to complete the OSHA 10-Hour Outreach Construction safety program who has not completed the program will be subject to removal from the worksite, if the employee does not provide documentation of having completed such program by the fifteenth day after the date the employee is found to be in noncompliance.

The state may also assess a civil penalty of up to $2,500; in addition, such an employer shall be assessed a civil penalty of $100 per employee for each day of noncompliance.

The following individuals are exempt from the requirements of the OSHA 10-Hour Construction safety program:

Law enforcement officers dealing with traffic control and/or jobsite security; all relevant federal, state and municipal government inspectors.

 

The Delaware Valley Safety Council also offers OSHA-10 Hour General Industry, OSHA 10-Hour Construction and 30-Hour Construction Outreach safety training on a proctored basis daily at our Delaware and New Jersey locations. Visit www.dvsconline.org for more information.