Electrical Training & Safety

With the growing need for training in the electrical field, particularly with regard to OSHA and NFPA 70E, Delaware Valley Safety Council has entered into a strategic partnering agreement with Shermco Industries.

sherco-logoShermco Industries is a provider of testing, maintenance, repair, commissioning, engineering and training services for electrical infrastructure including substations, switchgear, transformers, motors and generators. With its recent acquisition of Magna Electric Corporation, a Canadian firm, Shermco Industries is now the North American leader in electrical power system maintenance, repair, testing, and training.

Shermco currently offers twelve (12) training courses in the electrical field. Through this strategic alliance, DVSC will be offering these courses at both of our facilities. The courses range in duration from 8 hours to 36 hours, and have maximum class sizes of either 14 or 20 students.

**Click on a course below for 2017 dates** 

How To Register

(1)  Complete/Download the Registration Form

(2)  Save the Registration Form to your computer

(3)  Email the Registration Form to dvscadministration@comcast.net

Electrical Training & Safety  Course Offerings:

Electrical Safety for Qualified Electrical Workers (NFPA 70E)

Cost:  $790

Class size is limited to 15 participants

Who Should Attend:
All technicians, field-service personnel, HVAC technicians, multi-craft personnel who work on electrical equipment, electricians, supervisors and engineers who supervise employees who perform operation or maintenance work on electric devices and equipment with voltage ratings from 50 volts and greater.

Course Description:
A practical, intensive electrical safety program designed to meet the mandated OSHA safety training requirements [Fed/OSHA 29CFR1910 1910.331-.335 (Electrical Safety Related Work Practices)], and 1910.137 (Electrical Protective Devices), hazards of electricity, NFPA 70E Articles 110 through 130 (now updated to include 2012 edition changes), Hazard and PPE Assessments, Energized Work Permits are all taught from the stand-point of field experience. This course focuses on the practical application of the OSHA regulations and NFPA 70E, rather than just explaining them.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Hands-on training ( 20%) program augmented with video and round-table discussions. Attendees should have basic electrical training. Some field experience is also recommended, but not mandatory.

Outline

I Introduction

A. Terms and definitions (70E and OSHA)
B. Hazards of Electricity

1. Shock
2. Arc
3. Blast

II Performing an Electrical Hazard Analysis

A. Determining nominal voltage
B. Shock Approach Distances
C. The Arc Flash Boundary
D. Determining PPE if no Arc Flash Hazard Analysis is performed
E. How to choose PPE based on the hazard
F. Hazard vs. risk

III. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

A. Inspection, maintenance and testing of:

1. Head and hearing protection
2. Eye and face protection
3. Arc flash protection

a. Types of clothing

4. Use of dielectric footwear
5. Rubber protective equipment

a. Gloves
b. Blankets and shields

B. Using the NFPA 70E tables properly
C. Determining the correct arc rating of PPE
D. Using NFPA 70E Annex H, “Guidance on Selection of PPE”

1. Simplified two-category system
2. Guidance on selection of PPE when an Arc Flash Hazard Analysis is performed
3. Use of 8 and 40 cal/cm2 PPE

IV.Energized Work

A. Energized electrical work policy
B. Guarding energized electrical equipment
C. Energized Electrical Work Permits

1. Exceptions

D. Establishing a safe work zone

V. De-energized Work

A. Placing equipment in an Electrically-Safe Work Condition
B. Switching procedures
C. Clearance orders
D. Safety Electrical One-Line Diagrams
E. Identifying “Look-Alike” equipment
F. Use of voltage detection equipment

1. Selection of the proper voltage tester
2. Limitations of common voltage testers
3. Verifying meter operation before use
4. Choosing the correct PPE
5. Safe operation and use
5. Verifying meter operation after use
6. Induced voltages vs. back feeds
7. Testing taped connections

VI. Specific Equipment Hazards

A. Circuit breakers and switches
B. Transformers
C. Instrument transformers

VII. Hands-On Lab Sessions

A. Inspecting PPE and insulated tools
B. Interpreting Arc Flash Hazard Labels
C. Proper use of the NFPA 70E Tables
D. Performing a JHA
E. Choosing and using voltage detection equipment

Electrical Safety Refresher Training

(29CFR1910 – Subpart S and the NFPA 70E)
8 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
All technicians, field-service personnel, electricians, supervisors and engineers who supervise employees who perform operation or maintenance work on electric utilization equipment. Designed for anyone who works on or near exposed, energized conductors or circuit parts that has attended the Electrical Safety for Qualified Electrical Workers course or its equivalent.

Course Description:
This is a one-day practical electrical safety refresher course designed for personnel who have already completed the OSHAmandated electrical safety training (such as our Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices and NFPA 70E course). Attendees will benefit from examples and videos designed to reacquaint them with electrical hazards and the need for using PPE. Arc Flash Labels, shock and arc flash approach boundaries and choosing Personal Protective Equipment are covered as well as Energized Electrical Work Permits and placing equipment in an Electrically-Safe Work Condition.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Hands-on lab sessions are not included in this seminar-based program, but it is augmented with video and round-table discussions. Attendees should have completed OSHA-mandated electrical safety training.

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Hazards of Electricity

a. Shock
b. Arc flash
c. Arc blast

B. Review of Chapter 1, Article 130
C. Arc Flash and Shock Boundaries

a. Flash Protection Boundary
b. Limited Approach Boundary
c. Restricted Approach Boundary
d. Prohibited Approach Boundary

D. Interpreting Arc Flash Labels

II. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

A. Specific PPE requirements

a. How to choose arc flash PPE using the NFPA 70E and IEEE 1584
b. Limitations of PPE and equipment
c. Inspection of PPE and equipment
d. Use of PPE and equipment
e. Care and storage

III. Energized Work

A. Live work policy
B. Energized Electrical Work Permits
C. Establishing a safe work zone

IV. Deenergized Work

A. Placing equipment in an Electrically-Safe Work Condition (LOTO)
B. Hazards of de-energized equipment
C. Testing for the absence of voltages

Basic Electrical Fundamentals

electrical-training-safety-courses-216 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
Operations and Maintenance personnel who need an understanding of electricity.

Course Description:
A must-have training program for unqualified workers or those new to electrical work. This practical 2-day course provides the information newer electrical workers need to have in order to understand maintenance and testing of electrical equipment and systems. Beginning with terminology, definitions and basic concepts, the program continues with dc and ac systems, including generator theory single-phase and three-phase systems and simple schematics. Real-world examples are used to improve
transferring these concepts from the classroom to the work place. Information in this course is kept to the need-to-know, practical level so students can apply the concepts and principles quickly to real-world situations. The student’s understanding of the material will also be evaluated through written practical exercises, quizzes, and a final examination.

Lab Time and Prerequisites: None

Outline

I. Matter, Energy, and Electricity

A. Matter
B. Conductors, Semiconductors, and Insulators
C. Electrostatics
D. Magnetism
E. Electrical Energy

i. Voltage and Current
ii. Resistance
iii. Conductance

F. Matter, Energy, and Electricity Quiz

II. Batteries

A. Theory
B. Construction
C. Charging
D. Batteries Quiz

III. Direct Current (DC) Fundamentals

A. Ohm’s Law
B. Power
C. Kirchoff’s Laws for Voltage and Current
D. Calculating Voltage, Resistance, Current, and Power in series and parallel Circuits
E. DC Fundamentals Quiz

IV. Lab Session and Demonstrations

A. Matter, Energy, and Electricity
B. Batteries

V. Alternating Current Fundamentals

A. Generating an AC Voltage and Current
B. Three‐phase Power
C. The Power Triangle
D. Inductance, Capacitance, and Reactance
E. Voltage and Power in Three‐Phase Circuits
F. AC (AC) Fundamentals Quiz

VI. Transformer Theory and Operation

A. Lab Sessions and Demonstrations

VII. N/A

A. Calculating Voltage, Current, and Resistance in DC Circuits
B. Calculating Voltage, Current, Impedance, and Power in Single‐ and Three‐Phase AC Circuits

Basic Electrical Technical Skills

24 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
Technicians and electricians who do not have extensive backgrounds in electrical technical skills including apprentices, helpers and others transferring from other positions who may have construction-level knowledge, but don’t have the technical skills to work on or near electrical equipment.

Course Description:
This 4-day training program concentrates on developing the skills and knowledge electrical workers need to work safely and effectively around energized electrical equipment. Single-line diagrams and equipment data plates will be used to familiarize students with the common types of equipment found in an electrical system. The use and limitations of various types of test equipment is covered including the proper use of multimeters, proximity testers, megohmmeters, micro-ohmmeters and more. Safe
work practices will be demonstrated during lab exercises where the student will operate and test cables, switchgear, breakers, motor controls, and related components. The student’s understanding of the material will also be evaluated through written practical exercises, quizzes, and a final examination.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Hands-on training (> 50%) program. Some field experience is recommended, but not mandatory. Student should bring a calculator and, if preferred, their own mulitimeter. Prerequisite: An understanding of basic electricity acquired through classroom/OJT or completion of the Basic Electrical Fundamentals course.

Outline

I. Electrical Power Systems

A. Types of Power Systems and Equipment
B. Power Systems and Equipment Quiz

II. Single‐Line Diagrams

A. Symbols and Device Numbers
B. Single‐Line Diagrams
C. Reading Single‐Line Diagrams Exercise

III. Electrical Safety Concepts Review

A. Hazards of Electricity
B. Electrical Testing Safety
C. Safety Quiz

IV. System Equipment Fundamentals

A. Transformers
B. Circuit Breakers and Trip Units
C. Contactors
D. Switches
E. Motors and Motor Control Centers
F. Lab sessions on operating system equipment
G. Lab session on interpreting trip curves

V. Electrical Test Equipment

A. Clamp‐on ammeters
B. Megohmmeters
C. Micro‐ohmeters
D. Ground resistance testers
E. Overpotential test set
F. Lab sessions on using test equipment

1. Testing Circuit Breakers/Switches
2. Testing Cables
3. Testing Motors
4. Ground Resistance Testing

Electrical Print Reading

Who Should Attend:
Electrical technicians, field engineers, electrical estimators, project managers, inspectors, contractors, and journeyman electricians who depend on effective skills and knowledge of print reading.

Course Description:
This 3-day course will prepare your electrical personnel to troubleshoot from electrical prints. Maintenance and technical personnel at commercial, industrial and military installations will benefit from this training. Don’t watch your electrical personnel troubleshoot by replacing components. This program will teach them how to effectively interpret the most common types of electrical prints and drawings (one-lines and three-lines, legends and schematics) and slash their troubleshooting time.
Attendees are encouraged to bring examples of their prints to use during practical exercises. Low, medium and high-voltage systems are covered, as well as specific needs of the students.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Hands-on (~30%) training program augmented with round-table discussions.

Outline

I. Print Reading Basics

A. Legends
B. Electrical symbols
C. Basic layout
D. Practical exercise using example prints

II. One-Line Diagrams

A. Purpose
B. Types
C. Interpretation and use
D. Practical exercise using one-lines

III. Elementary Diagrams

A. Purpose
B. Interpretation and use
C. Practical exercise using elementary diagrams

IV. Schematics

A. Purpose
B. Interpretation and use
C. Practical exercise using schematics

V. Field Exercise Using Prints and Local Facilities

Electrical Safety for Managers

8 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
This course is intended to educate supervisors, managers, engineers and others who supervise or have responsibilities for electrical workers.

Course Description:
OSHA 29CFR1910.335 and .269, as well as the NFPA 70E require that the hazard to the employee be assessed and proper personal protective equipment (PPE) be used. OSHA 29CFR1910.335(a)(1)(i) states, “Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be provided with, and shall use, electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be protected and the work to be performed.” So, how do we comply? This course is designed to help managers, supervisors and engineers limit their company’s liability and enhance worker safety. Attendees each receive a copy of the “Electrical Safety Program Handbook” by Ray and Jane Jones, which is used as the course text.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
No prerequisites or hands-on lab sessions. Practical exercises throughout the course are used to enhance the student’s knowledge and ability to use the text properly and efficiently.

Outline

I. Regulation and Consensus Standard Overview

A. 29CFR1910.331 – .335
B. 29CFR1910.269
C. 29CFR1910.132
D. NFPA 70E – 2004
E. IEEE 1584-2002
F. OSHA Multi-Employer Worksite Policy
E. Performing an Arc Flash Study
F. Steps to reduce hazards

II. Using the NFPA 70E

A. Articles 110 – 130
B. Interpreting Tables 130.7
C. Hazard/Risk Categories (HRC)

III. Electrical Hazards

A. Shock
B. Arc Flash
C. Blast

IV. Managing Electrical Safety

A. Responsibilities
B. The Electrical Safety Program

1. What it should contain
2. Steps in setting up an ESP
3. Recommended procedures

C. How to comply
D. Performing an Electrical Hazard Analysis

1. Site assessments

Electrical Safety for Utilities

(29CFR1910 – Subpart S and the NFPA 70E)
16 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
All technicians, field-service personnel, electricians, supervisors and engineers who supervise employees who perform operation or maintenance work on electric utilization equipment. Designed for anyone who works on or near exposed, energized conductors or circuit parts that has attended the Electrical Safety for Qualified Electrical Workers course or its equivalent.

Course Description:
This is a one-day practical electrical safety refresher course designed for personnel who have already completed the OSHAmandated electrical safety training (such as our Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices and NFPA 70E course). Attendees will benefit from examples and videos designed to reacquaint them with electrical hazards and the need for using PPE. Arc Flash Labels, shock and arc flash approach boundaries and choosing Personal Protective Equipment are covered as well as Energized Electrical Work Permits and placing equipment in an Electrically-Safe Work Condition.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Hands-on lab sessions are not included in this seminar-based program, but it is augmented with video and round-table discussions. Attendees should have completed OSHA-mandated electrical safety training.

Outline

I. 29CFR1910.269

A. Training Requirements

1. Qualified worker

B. Medical Services and First Aid

1. 1910.151
2. 1910.269(b)

C. Job Briefings
D. LOTO for Generators
E. Enclosed Spaces
F. Personal Protective Equipment
G. Ladders and Platforms
H. Hand and Portable Power Tools

1. Inspection
2. Maintenance

I. Live-Line Tools

1. Inspection
2. Maintenance
3. Testing

J. Materials Handling and Storage

1. Working space around equipment
2. Qualified vs unqualified access

K. Working On or Near Exposed, Energized Parts

1. Buddy system
2. Minimum approach distances
3. Making connections
4. Apparel
5. Fuse handling

L. Deenergizing Lines and Equipment

1. Switching procedures
2. Clearance orders
3. Safety Electrical One-Line Diagrams

a. Purpose
b. Uses
c. Interpreting

M. Testing for the absence of voltages
N. Grounding for the Protection of Employees

1. When to use
2. Sizing grounds
3. How to apply grounds
4. Induced voltages
5. Step and touch potentials

O. Testing and Test Facilities
P. Mechanical Equipment
Q. Overhead Lines

1. Equipotential zones

R. Communications Facilities
S. Underground Electrical Installations
T. Substations
U. Power Generation
V. Special Conditions

II. Specific Equipment Hazards

A. Circuit breakers
B. Switches
C. Transformers
D. Instrument transformers
E. Batteries

III. Lab Sessions

A. Using hot sticks and shotguns
B. Inspecting PPE and insulated tools
C. Using voltage detection equipment

Motor Maintenance & Testing

3 Days at 24 Contact Hours

  • Hands-on maintenance course
  • Learn what maintenance and tests to perform on motors
  • Learn how to troubleshoot motors
  • Perform common maintenance and tests on motors

Course Description:
This 3-day course is designed for plant maintenance technicians and electricians. This course covers basic theory and operation of induction and synchronous motors, maintenance and testing on equipment rated 50 HP and larger. Hands-on labs cover inspection and maintenance of various types of bearings, slip-ring and/or commutator maintenance, including dressing and undercutting. Common troubleshooting due to heat, vibration and unbalanced electrical loads is also covered. The most common electrical tests are covered, including insulation resistance, surge comparison and hipotting Students will learn what maintenance is required to maintain a motor’s efficiency and reliability as well as economic considerations. Beginning with inspection techniques and requirements, brush, commutator and slip ring maintenance is covered in detail. Also covered is motor disassembly, shaft removal and inspection, stator cleaning, how to properly lubricate
motors, repack open bearings, replace bearings and identify leads.

Outline

I. Basic Motor Theory and Operation

A. Types of motors

1. AC
2. DC

B. Operation and construction
C. Capacitors
D. Exciters

1. Rotating
2. Solid-state

II. Mechanical and Visual Inspection

A. External signs of trouble
B. Shaft Inspection
C. Ground connections
D. Capacitors

III. Motor Maintenance

A. Cleaning
B. Inspections
C. Vibration tests
D. Phase and rotation checks
E. Tachometers
F. Slip ring & commutator maintenance

IV. Bearings and Lubrication

A. Types
B. Removal
C. Repacking

V. Safety During Maintenance

VI. Lab Session on Motor Maintenance

VII. Motor Testing

A. What tests to do
B. Intervals

VIII. Tests

A. Insulation Resistance
B. Polarization Index
C. Step Voltage
D. Surge-Comparison Testing
E. High-Potential Testing
F. Motor heat & vibration run
G. Insulation power factor
H. Evaluating results

IX. Safety During Testing

X. Lab Session on Motor Testing

Industrial Plant Electrical Maintenance

Who Should Attend:
Electricians, technicians, supervisors, and plant engineers who perform the maintenance, testing and
evaluation of common types of circuit breakers, transformers, motors, and motor controls found in industrial facilities.

Course Description:
This course covers what maintenance personnel and managers should know about maintenance and how it affects plant reliability. The maintenance and testing required for common plant devices, including transformers, protective relays, circuit breakers and cubicle maintenance, motors, and motor controls is covered in detail. Based on the NFPA 70E and ANSI/NETA Maintenance Testing Specifications, this intensive training program provides the latest information on maintaining
and testing electrical power system equipment, including what to do, when to do it and interpreting test results.

Lab vs. Lecture Time:
Approximately 20% hands-on and written practical exercises.

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Student introductions
B. Pre-Test
C. Safety

II. Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers

A. Types
B. Operation and Racking
C. Inspection
D. Maintenance

1. Overpotential Tests
2. Contact resistance Tests
3. Insulation resistance Test
5. Contact Motion Analysis

E. Cubicle Maintenance

III. Medium-Voltage Circuit Breakers

A. Types

1. Air
2. Vacuum

B. Operation and Racking
C. Inspection
D. Maintenance

1. Overpotential Tests
2. Contact resistance Tests
3. Insulation resistance Test
4. Power Factor Tests
5. Contact Motion Analysis

E. Cubicle Maintenance

IV. Motor Maintenance

A. Basic Motor Theory

1. Construction
2. Motor Controls

a. MV Motor Controller
b. LV Motor Controller

3. Operation

a. Motor Starting Circuits

4. Motor Protection

a. Motor Overload Relays

5. Maintenance and Testing

V. Switches and Disconnects

A. Types
B. Operation
C. Inspection
D. Maintenance

1. Overpotential Tests
2. Contact resistance Tests
3. Insulation resistance Test

VI. Transformer Maintenance and Testing

A. Annual Inspection
B. Insulation Resistance Testing
C. Transformer Turns Ratio (TTR)
D. Winding Resistance
E. Power Factor
F. Excitation Current
G. Oil Testing

VII. Interpreting Results & Trend Analysis

A. ANSI/NETA MTS

VIII. Practical Exercises

A. CB Operation/Racking
B. CB/Cubicle Visual Inspection
C. CB Electrical Testing

VIV. Final Test and Course Critique

Circuit Breaker Maintenance, Operation & Controls

electrical-training-safety-courses-336 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
All field and shop technicians, maintenance personnel, supervisors and others responsible for testing, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of low- and medium-voltage circuit breakers, and associated operating and control systems and devices.

Course Description:
Students will learn the electrical and electromechanical operating and control systems of a wide variety of circuit breakers, safety aspects, troubleshooting and correcting operating problems, and testing and maintenance associated with those control systems to ensure safe, correct and reliable operation. This includes an overview of direct-acting protection devices in low voltage circuit breakers, and external systems essential for proper breaker operation such as switchgear cubicles, relays and instrumentation in conjunction with both low- and medium-voltage circuit breakers.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Approximately 40% hands-on lab time vs. 60% lecture, provided that breakers, switchgear and other protective devices, and applicable test instruments, equipment and technical materials are available for hands-on training.

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Safety and Course Administration
B. Student introductions
C. Course Overview
D. Pre-Test

II. Circuit Breaker Safety

A. MWAA Applicable Safety Procedures
B. Arc Flash Awareness
C. Personal Protective Equipment

1. Arc Flash Warning Labels
2. PPE Selection and Inspection
3. Donning and Doffing

D. Lock Out / Tag Out (LOTO)

1. Racking/Clearing Breakers
2. Breaker Removal/Insertion
3. Clearing Switchgear

E. Test Before Touch (TBT)

1. Low Voltage Detection
2. Medium Voltage Detection
3. Applying Personal Grounds

III. Print Reading

A. Introduction and Basics

1. ANSI/IEEE Device Numbers
2. Common Symbols
3. Drawing-Specific Symbols and Technical Data

B. Power System One-Line Diagrams
C. Power System Schematics

1. Generic Breaker Schematics
2. Model-Specific Schematics

IV. Circuit Breaker Fundamentals

A. Low Voltage Circuit Breakers

1. Definitions
2. Nameplate data
3. Circuit breaker components
4. Arc interruption
5. Primary causes of circuit breaker failure

B. Medium Voltage Circuit Breakers

1. Definitions
2. Nameplate data
3. Circuit breaker components
4. Arc interruption
5. Primary causes of circuit breaker failure

V. Circuit Breaker Cubicle Service

A. LVCB cubicle interface

1. Safety procedures
2. Racking mechanism
3. Primary and secondary contacts
4. Interlocks

a. Breaker
b. Kirk-Key, others

5. Metering and Supervisory Instruments
6. Cubicle Maintenance and Testing

B. MVCB cubicle interface

1. Safety procedures
2. Racking mechanism
3. Primary and secondary contacts

a. MOC and TOC switches
b. Shutters

4. Interlocks

a. Breaker
b. Kirk-Key, others

5. Metering and Supervisory Instruments
6. CTs and PTs
7. Cubicle Maintenance and Testing

VI. Circuit Breaker Maintenance

A. Low Voltage Circuit Breakers

1. Circuit breaker cleaning and lubrication
2. Circuit breaker adjustments
3. Circuit breaker testing

a. Contact resistance
b. Insulation resistance
c. Primary injection
d. Secondary injection

B. Medium-Voltage Circuit Breakers

1. Circuit breaker cleaning and lubrication
2. Circuit breaker adjustments
3. Circuit breaker testing

a. Contact resistance
b. Insulation resistance
c. Vacuum bottle integrity
d. Over-potential

VII. Lab Sessions

A. System Operations

1. Identify LVCB operating system and controls
2. Identify MVCB operating system and controls
3. Identify switchgear controls

B. LVCB’s & MVCB’s

1. Inspecting circuit breakers
2. Circuit breaker disassembly and reassembly
3. Troubleshooting and repair
4. Circuit breaker testing

C. System Operation and Controls

1. Racking LVCB’s and MVCB’s
2. Operating LVCB’s and MVCB’s
3. Troubleshooting LVCB systems
4. Troubleshooting MVCB systems

VIII. Final Test

IX. Review Final Test

X. Course Evaluation

XI. Parting Thoughts

Low to Medium-Voltage Circuit Breaker Maintenance & Testing

36 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
Field and shop technicians, circuit breaker rebuilders, supervisors and others responsible for the testing and maintenance of molded-case, insulated-case and low-voltage power (drawout) air circuit breakers.

Course Description:
Students will learn safe and proper maintenance and testing procedures on a variety of circuit breakers, including Siemens, ABB, Cutler-Hammer, Westinghouse, GE, Square-D, and ITE. Students will disassemble backboard assemblies, perform maintenance, reassemble and adjust circuit breakers. Overcurrent device testing will be performed on low-voltage circuit breakers, along with other standard tests. Power factor, vacuum bottle integrity and overpotential testing are among the tests
performed on medium-voltage breakers. All testing and maintenance is done in accordance with NETA, ANSI and NEMA standards. Class size is limited to 14 participants.

Lab Time and Prerequisites:
Approximately 60% hands-on lab time vs. 40% lecture. This will vary with the actual class.

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Student introductions
B. Pre-Test

II. Circuit Breaker Safety

A. 29CFR1910
B. Removal
C. Inspection
D. Servicing
E. Testing
F. Installation

III. Circuit Breaker Maintenance

A. Circuit breaker fundamentals

1. Definitions
2. Nameplate data
3. Circuit breaker components

B. Circuit breaker cubicle service

1. Circuit breaker removal
2. Circuit breaker cubicle service
3. Cubicle testing

C. Circuit breaker service

1. Circuit breaker service
2. Circuit breaker adjustments
3. Circuit breaker testing
4. Restoring the circuit breaker to service

D. Overcurrent trip devices

1. Series/direct-acting trip devices
2. Overcurrent trip device functions
3. Solid-state trip devices
4. Setting overcurrent trip devices
5. Time-current characteristic curves

IV. Testing Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers

A. Micro-ohmmeter
B. Insulation resistance
C. Overpotential
D. Overcurrent device

V. Testing Medium-Voltage Circuit Breakers

A. Micro-ohmmeter
B. Overpotential
C. Power Factor
D. Vacuum bottle integrity

VI. Lab Sessions

A. Inspecting circuit breakers
B. Circuit breaker disassembly & reassembly
C. Interpreting time-current curves
D. Testing circuit breakers

VII. Post Test and Course Evaluation

Cable Splicing & Termination of Medium-Voltage Cables

32 Contact Hours

Who Should Attend:
All technicians, field-service personnel, electricians, supervisors and engineers that perform or supervise employees that perform maintenance, installations, splicing, and terminate of medium voltage cable systems.

Description:
A technical and practical hands on program which encompasses the procedures and methods for the proper splicing and termination of medium voltage cables. By exposing the student to both class room and lab sessions, the student learns both the technical and practical requirements of modern cable construction, repair and termination. The student will perform acceptance testing on their finished work to enhance their confidence and enable the student to better determine the
condition of cables they will encounter in the future. In the classroom portion the student will learn the anatomy and construction of medium voltage cables, preparation and proper handling/storage of cables. The methods as taught are based on the latest guidelines and procedures as recommended by the equipment manufacturers and current industry standards.

Prerequisites:
Previous experience in working with medium voltage cables is recommended but not mandatory.

Outline

I. Introduction

A. Terms and definitions
B. Handling of medium voltage cables
C. Hazards of electricity

1. Shock
2. Arc
3. Blast

II. Testing and evaluation of power cables

A. Cable Identification
B. General requirements
C. High voltage testing
D. Interpretation of results
E. Return to service

III. Anatomy of a cable

A. Conductor
B. Semi-conductor
C. Insulation
D. Jacket

IV. Making the connection

A. Measurement and layout
B. Crimp splice
C. Terminals
D. Conductor

V. Cable stress relief

A. Proper stripping
B. Proper tapping methods
C. Preformed
D. Shrink method

1. Heat
2. Cold

VI. Shielding

A. Static shielding
B. Current rated
C. Available fault current
D. Allowing for future growth

VII. Lab Sessions

A. Hands on tapping methods
B. Heat shrinking methods
C. Cold shrink methods
C. Pre-forms
D. Testing